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The EPA demonstrates new thermal energy project to decontaminate water

The EPA demonstrates new thermal energy project to decontaminate water (NTV News)

On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency demonstrated a fresh way of decontaminating soil that has been around for nearly 10 years and began in the oil and gas industry.

It uses thermal energy.

This project is being called the Cleburn Street Well Superfund Site.

Located on the corner of Eddy and 4th in Grand Island, you can see tubes, chords and 100 wells working on treating water contamination.

This clean up first began in the 1980's, after a dry-cleaning business contaminated the soil below over 20 feet down.

"And at the time we didn't have the technology to fully clean up the site and now new technologies came out with the thermal technology, we're able to clean up the site and we're really excited about it,” said David Wennerstrom, the EPA Project Manager.

Wennerstrom told NTV News that what happens is they heat water, 20 to 60 feet below the surface, to boiling temperatures.

That will help them capture the contaminant and clean it.

It all works to clean the aquifer- the drinking water source for many in Nebraska.

Wennerstrom told NTV News that the only other way to do this, would have been to excavate down 60 feet, dig up the area and close roads.

He said this new technology saves money and years of work.

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