Tips to adjust your body to Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time can impact the body in different ways, especially if not adjusted properly.

KEARNEY, Neb. — It is that time of year again where we lose one hour of sleep.

Daylight Saving Time can impact the body in different ways, especially if not adjusted properly.

In a study done in 2016, 40 percent of people, who took a survey, said they do not like daylight saving time and they feel as if it is not the best way to save energy.

Some ways to fuel the body is to set a bedtime.

This could help with your sleep pattern, especially when losing one hour of shut-eye.

Another tip that comes from The Better Sleep Council is exercising two hours before you go to bed or to take a 20 to 30 minute nap.

The study showed both could get your body relaxed and ready for bed.

The time change can also apply to kids.

One thing the study suggest is to adjust their bedtime schedule to coincide with the time shift. Also, to make sure their room is completely dark.

Other tips include no caffeine after 12 p.m. and to turn off electronics before bed

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